REQUESTS etc
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I ASKED  "WHERE DOES ROBERT BELONG ON THE FAMILY TREE?"
ROBERT HAS BEEN LOCATED NOW (thanks to Catharine) BUT THIS IS WHAT I ASKED:

Found on a website in November 2002:
Robert Maunder and Margaret McCrimmon celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary June 20, 2002.

The Maunders met at Kalamazoo College (Michigan) during a college chapel service in 1938. Both were 17. Margaret recalled that he was rather loud and boisterous. "At first I didn't like him very much," she admitted. Robert remembered that Margaret was musical and popular: "She had lots of girlfriends as well as boyfriends."
Somehow, by the time they were juniors in college, they were sweethearts.

They were married in South Haven, Michigan. After a brief honeymoon in Northern Michigan, they moved to Syracuse, NY, where Robert taught freshman English at Syracuse University on a graduate fellowship until he entered the armed forces in February, 1943. He served three years.

Robert began his public teaching career in Lansing, Michigan, in 1946. He became principal of Otto Junior High School in 1954 and spent 12 years in that post. Meanwhile, the family was growing. By the time Margaret and Robert moved to Vacaville, California, in 1966, they had eight children. Margaret and Robert both started teaching in Vacaville and enrolled the children in local schools. Robert was appointed principal of the adult school and also taught English while Margaret taught third grade at Alamo School. They both retired in 1986.

All eight of their children graduated from Vacaville High School.

To celebrate their parents 60th anniversary, the whole family - 29 in all - went to a Giants' game in Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco, then out to dinner. "What a wonderful time it was," said Robert. Asked for the secret of their long, loving relationship, Robert laughed and said, "With that many children you don't have time to fight."

And Margaret added thoughtfully: "We enjoy together time and apart time."

PLEASE EMAIL IF YOU CAN YOU HELP WITH ANY DETAILS ABOUT 
ROBERT and MARGARET 


DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT JASON E MAUNDERS?

I have received a request for help and you might just be the person who can help. Following is part of the request that I was sent:

"I recently started working on my daughter-in-law's family history.  I was speaking to her cousin and it was mentioned that there was a cousin to her grandfather by the name of Jason E. Maunders. He lived in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, USA.

"Jason died September 24 1967 survived only by a 2nd cousin, an aunt and 17 nieces and nephews. He must had sisters but I don't believe he had any brothers or if so they preceded him leaving no sons to follow them. I don't even know if he was ever married. The remark was made that he was the last of the "Maunders". At this point it appears that their last name was spelled with an 's' at the end.

"Does any of this sound familiar to you??"

PLEASE EMAIL IF YOU CAN HELP WITH ANY DETAILS ABOUT 
JASON E MAUNDER(S)?

  and please quote reference number 2205


JOHN MAUNDER of WITHYCOMBE, DEVON
(Can anyone help me to place this John Maunder, his wife Catherine and his father - also John, of course - in the family tree?)
Mill Street, Withycombe, Devon is just a short thoroughfare, running from the ford at the bottom of Rattle Row to its junction with Lower and West Streets. Its name gives an indication of its most important feature. However, on the other side of the road are some interesting old cottages (although one or two are a mere 150 years old). Their history is difficult to unravel because, like many such rows of cottages, they originated from single, older dwellings, and so tend not to have separate leases, etc.

The Mill - still standing but with the mill wheel now gone - is now a private dwelling. It is likely that the first mill on the site was operating by around 1238. The earliest mention, however, of the mill so far is when, in 1386, James Durburgh, the then owner of the future Withycombe Hadley, mortgaged his holdings, which included two thirds of the mill.

The 1502 rental names Robert Thorne as the holder of two parts of a corn mill, paying 6/8d annually; he also paid 8d "for water there flowing to the mill". He also held a tenement and a cottage; and he was also named in an earlier list (date unclear, ca 1490?) as paying 8/10d annually for property unspecified, but which could have included the mill. Then in 1506/7 John Thorne paid 7/4d, clearly for mill and mill race. The Thornes would continue to feature among the village's leading farmers throughout the next 300 years. In September 1692 the manor court presented Robert Hosegood (crossed out) and George Chester, for "suffering his Mill to be ruinous & in decay" and ordered him to make repairs before the 1st November or suffer a fine of 1/6/8, a considerable sum. George was finding it difficult to maintain the mill and two years later he surrendered his copy in favour of John Maunder junior. A survey of Withycombe Wyke reveals that John Maunder also acquired the copyhold of its third part of the mill around that time.

Neither John Maunder nor his father of the same name lived in the village at this time, although the latter probably did in the mid 17th century, when the farm known as Maunder's (modern Christopher's) was his property and he baptised a son in the village . Now though the Maunder family rented property there solely for profit, including the mill and the King's Arms. He may have doubted the wisdom of taking on the mill however, because it was obviously an old building in dire need of repair. He was presented to the manor court of Withycombe Hadley in 1700 "for not repairing & keeping in order the footway near his Mill" and was ordered to do so under penalty of four nobles. (A noble was a gold coin worth 6/8d, coincidentally equal to the mill's rent, so the fine was equivalent to four times the rent of the property).

When Col. Codrington sold off the manor of Withycombe W yke in 1709, John Maunder's third part of the mill remained unsold; so in 1714 it was released and conveyed from Codrington to Madam Luttrell, the owner of the manor of Withycombe Hadley. It was described as being "in the possession of John Maunder or his undertenants". John Maunder and his mill dominated business at the Easter manor court in 1715. First Samuel Kent of Bowden and Andrew Newton of Combe Farm were presented for diverting the water from Red Girts (the source of the Withycombe brook), to the detriment of John Maunder and the tenant of the mill, who was named. Unfortunately the latter's name is unclear. Then Maunder himself was presented, again for his path being out of repair. It seems also that he tried to assert his right to expand(?) there and around this path, but the details of his argument are again unclear. The complaints against John Maunder were repeated annually and in 1717 an admonishment "for not laying planks or boards at the lower Mill Pond" was added. He paid the church rate of threepence halfpenny due for the mill in 1718 but then died before the Easter manor court of the following year.

The complaints were then directed briefly at his widow Catherine Maunder until she also died prior to 1723, whereupon Mary Escott was presented as the new tenant. At the same time Henry Escott took out a lease on "all that water grist mill and dwelling ho use called Withycombe Mills late in the possession of Catherine Maunder widow lately deceased"

HAVE YOU HEARD OF HARRY MAUNDER?

A Canadian person has sent the following request:
My great grandfather was Harry Maughan. He was born on Toronto, Ontario, Canada in the 1860s or 1870s. He was an insurance man, working for Hartford. He married Eleanor Harriet Predam and they had three sons: Alan, John and Edward.

About 1905 to 1910 Harry left his family and travelled at least as far as New York City and Philadelphia USA. He wrote letters home from those cities, signing his letters as "Harry Maunder".
It is possible that he later travelled to California and / or Australia.

PLEASE EMAIL IF YOU CAN HELP WITH ANY DETAILS ABOUT HARRY